U.S. Corps Delays Dakota Access Pipeline Construction Again, Wants More Information on Route

September 16, 2016 - Drummers and other Indigenous activists march in solidarity with the people of the Standing Rock Sioux in their fight against the Dakota Access Pipeline. By John Duffy [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

September 16, 2016 - Drummers and other Indigenous activists march in solidarity with the people of the Standing Rock Sioux in their fight against the Dakota Access Pipeline. By John Duffy [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced Monday it needs more information and tribal input before allowing Energy Transfer’s Dakota Access pipeline to cross under Lake Oahe in North Dakota.

The delayed easement means the Dakota Access pipeline protests are succeeding, according to the Standing Rock Sioux chairman. However, the developer of the pipeline denounced the delay in a statement Tuesday saying the decision is being motivated by politics “at the expense of a company that has done nothing but play by the rules.”

After finishing its review of the route, the Corps said more study was warranted and discussions with the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe were needed to decide if possible changes to the route were necessary to reduce the risk of an oil spill.

The current route for the Dakota Access pipeline travels underneath the Missouri River near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation located in southern North Dakota. Members of the tribe believe the pipeline could contaminate their water supply.

Source:
NPR
Houston Chronicle