Trans Mountain Pipeline Construction Work Restarts

A year after the project’s latest regulatory setback, construction on parts of the Trans Mountain pipeline is restarting, Trans Mountain Corp said on Wednesday. The pipeline was bought last year by the Canadian government to help ensure the completion of the expansion to 890,000 barrels of oil per day after years of delay and strong disapproval by environmental and some indigenous groups.

“We are very happy that people will be in the field, digging the ground and installing the pipe,” Canada’s Minister of Natural Resource Amarjeet Sohi said at a news conference in Edmonton.

In the fourth quarter of 2019, approximately 4,200 workers are expected to be employed along the pipeline corridor and the company has issued notices to some contractors to mobilize construction equipment and crews, Trans Mountain Chief Executive Ian Anderson said in a statement.

Work is restarting at the Burnaby storage terminal where the pipeline terminates, and the Westridge marine terminal, where crude is loaded onto tankers. It will also soon begin in communities along the pipeline’s right-of-way in Alberta between Edmonton and Edson, and in the Greater Edmonton area.

Given a reason that the company failed to adequately consult indigenous groups, last year a Canadian court overturned the federal government’s 2016 approval of the project. But after a new regulatory review that gave a huge relief to Canada’s oil industry, Justin Trudeau’s Liberal government re-approved the pipeline in June.

Source:
reuters