Enbridge Supported by Wisconsin Supreme Court in Dane County Case


A ruling from the Wisconsin Supreme Court has allowed Enbridge Energy to continue on with their pipeline project in Dane County without any additional insurance, despite the local government putting a requirement on Enbridge’s permit for a $25 million environmental liability policy.

Wisconsin lawmakers stepped in and passed a provision blocking local municipalities from putting liability requirements on an operator if they already had sufficient insurance. After a couple back and forths of courts contesting Enbridge’s quality of insurance, the high court ruled that Enbridge does have comprehensive insurance. According to Enbridge, they have $860 million worth of general liability insurance, including coverage for ’sudden and accidental’ pollution.

Despite the ruling, several people within local government have been adamant that Enbridge has yet to provide proof of adequate insurance for ’sudden and accidental’ cases. Concerned about the decision, Patricia Hammel, a landowner’s attorney, stated that it “allows Enbridge to operate the largest tar sands pipeline in the U.S. across Wisconsin without adequate insurance and exposes our people, land and water to the consequences of a catastrophic spill.”

Enbridge’s oil spill in 2010, in southwest Michigan, polluted almost 40 miles of the Kalamazoo River and cost them $1.2. billion. In addition, the United States fined them for missing deadlines on pipeline inspections prior to the spill, costing them an extra $1.8 million. The cleanup lasted until 2014.

Meanwhile, Enbridge has finished their $1.5 billion pipeline make-over and built the Waterloo pump station, which, according to a spokeswoman of Enbridge, Jennifer Smith, is necessary in order to “ensure a reliable source of energy for decades to come.”

Source:
Chron

Tallgrass Energy Announces Anchor Shipper for Seahorse Pipeline

Tallgrass Energy announced on Monday that it has signed a binding agreement with an unaffiliated third-party that will potentially be an anchor shipper and equity partner in Tallgrass’s Seahorse Pipeline.

The Seahorse Pipeline would move crude oil from Cushing, Okla. To both the St. James, La refining complex as well as Tallgrass’s planned Plaquemines Liquids Terminal (PLT) in Louisiana.

“The Seahorse agreement provides strong proof of concept for our pipeline project,” said Tallgrass Chief Operating Officer Bill Moler. “The market is excited about the versatility of Seahorse, which has multiple options including refinery demand in the St. James area and substantial export capability.”

On Nov. 30, Tallgrass Pony Express Pipeline, LLC will launch a new joint tariff open season soliciting shipper commitments for crude oil transportation under a joint tariff between the Pony Express and Seahorse Pipeline from Guernsey and DJ-Basin origin points to the St. James refinery complex and PLT.

There were additional announcements such as the acquisition of $30 million worth of land that will serve as the site for PLT. It is 600 acres across the Mississippi River about 30 miles south of New Orleans. PLT will offer up to 20 million barrels of storage for both crude oil and refined products and export facilities.

Source:
Street Insider

Bueckeye's Pipeline Repair Facing Storm Delays After River Spill

Buckeye Partners LP said on Monday that they plan on beginning full repair work this week on the jet fuel pipeline that breached and spilled 8,000 gallons of fuel into Indiana’s St. Marys River over the weekend.

Although clean-up efforts are already underway, replacing the broken line will need to be delayed because of rain storms that have raised the river’s level near Decatur, Indiana, said Buckeye spokesman Marty White.

“We’re dealing with the elements,” White said. “We’re hoping to get the pipeline back up and running this week, but it’s too soon to tell.”

The company does not yet have an estimate of clean-up costs and is unclear on when clean-up will finish or when the pipeline will be brought back online, White said.

The pipeline is buried beneath the channel and it would be impossible to fully repair it before water levels recede to normal levels, White said.

Source:
Reuters

Train Accident Spills 230,000 Gallons of Oil, Service Resumed

BNSF Railway Co stated on Monday that service will be resumed Tuesday on tracks in northwestern Iowa where a train left the track and spilled crude oil from derailed cars.

The derailing occurred near Doon, Iowa on Friday, sending 32 rail cars off the track with an estimated 230,000 gallons of spilled oil into flood waters including a nearby river.

The train included close to 58,000 barrels of crude oil traveling from Western Canada to Stroud, Oklahoma for oil producer ConocoPhillips, a Conoco spokesman said. The oil company said it doesn’t expect any serious disruption to its shipments due to the accident.

BNSF said in a statement that the crew is nearly finished removing the oil damage from the incident as well as repairing the tracks.

Booms have been placed “approximately five miles downstream to capture any oil that may have traveled with floodwaters through nearby fields.” said the railroad company.

BNSF has not said what caused the train accident. No injuries or fire resulted from the incident.

Source:
Reuters

 

3,100-Foot Natural Gas Pipeline to Cross Arkansas River

A 3,100-foot natural gas pipeline is set to be installed under the Arkansas River, replacing a 63-year old pipeline that ruptured in May, 2015 and released nearly 4 million cubic feet of natural gas into the river.

The pipeline is being built by Texas Eastern Transmission, a subsidiary of Enbridge. It will replace a 24-inch diameter pipeline by using a horizontal directional drill to dig a tunnel under the riverbed, which should result in a safer natural gas transportation and storage system, according to the industry.

The Texas Eastern project is currently pending approvals, but construction is expected to be complete by October.

The new pipeline will replace an old natural gas pipeline that ruptured in 2015 due to flooding that washed away riverbed and left the pipeline unsupported. The current pipeline runs from Texas to New Jersey.

Source:
Arkansas Online