PHMSA Approval Needed to Restart Texas Eastern Pipeline

The U.S. Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration issued a corrective action order last week to Enbridge Inc., on its Texas Eastern pipeline in Kentucky that was damaged in a blast on Aug. 1. The company has to perform several tasks before the regulator will allow any flows through the blast site, near Danville, Kentucky.

Enbridge said in a release on Friday it was “working diligently to comply with the requirements identified by the PHMSA, and to return to service two adjacent natural gas pipelines near the incident site that were taken out of service as a precautionary safety measure.”

Texas Eastern pipeline system includes three lines, Lines 10, 15 and 25, between its Danville and Tompkinsville compressors in Kentucky that make up its 30-inch system. According to PHMSA, despite the fact that the blast occurred on Line 15, Enbridge could not restart Lines 10 and 25 without further investigation, as the blast might have also damaged Lines 10 and 25.

Enbridge must uncover and inspect parts of the lines and perform mechanical and metallurgical testing, among other things, before restarting gas flows through the blast site, PHMSA said. The blast killed one person, injured at least six other people, destroyed multiple structures and caused a fire that damaged about 30 acres.

Source:
reuters

TC Energy Received Probable Violation Notice from PHMSA

TC Oil Operations, the company that owns Keystone pipeline failed to provide suitable coating material at numerous locations along the pipeline, according to The Pipeline and Hazardous Material Safety Administration. A notice of probable violation was issued by PHMSA as a result of an inspection of the Keystone Pipeline’s facilities and records.

PHMSA didn’t proposed any fines as a result of the probable violation, rather proposed a compliance order that requires TC Oil to “correct deficiencies in coating material so that they are suitable for prevention of atmospheric corrosion.”

According to the notice, the company also needs to provide a “record of the location of piping with insufficient coating and the date in which the appropriate coating was applied.”

“The operator used fusion bonded epoxy as a coating on numerous locations on the pipeline at and above the air soil interface,” the notice reads. TC Energy has six months from the date of the final order to comply.

The 2,600 miles pipeline runs from eastern Alberta, Canada, to Oklahoma and Illinois, and carries crude oil.

Source:
duluthnewstribune