NJ Joins NY in Rejecting the Northeast Supply Enhancement Project

New Jersey rejected the plans for Northeast Supply Enhancement pipeline project to move more natural gas to New York City by the winter of 2020-2021, Kallanish Energy reports.

A similar decision was taken last month by New York regulators. The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection has denied the water-quality certification needed by Williams for the project.

The agency said the project could “adversely impact surface water quality.” Williams is planning to resubmit the application. They have also refiled the permit application to New York regulators and is pending.

The Northeast Supply Enhancement project includes 10 miles of pipeline loops in Pennsylvania, three in New Jersey, 23 miles offshore in New Jersey and New York, a new compressor station in New Jersey and additional horsepower at an existing compressor station in Pennsylvania.

The project is being developed by Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Co., a Williams’ subsidiary and in New York, the pipeline would stretch under New York Bay to the Queens area of New York City.

National Grid, the largest distributor of natural gas in the northeast U.S said the project is crucial because pipeline capacity to New York is at capacity and natural gas demand in the New York City region is projected to grow by 10% in the next 10 years.

Source:
kallanishenergy

Natural Gas Pipeline Expansion Receives Construction Approval from FERC

Transco’s Northeast Supply Enhancement project received approval for construction from FERC. The pipeline expansion project will carry natural gas from the shale fields of Pennsylvania to New York, and will expand on the company’s existing pipeline infrastructure in New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania.

The project will add approximately 36 miles of new pipeline and add two new natural gas compressors at exiting compressor stations. The NSE project will replace the use of 900 thousand barrels of heating oil annually in the region with 400,000 dekatherms per day of natural gas by converting about 8,000 customers per year from heating oil to natural gas in the Northeast.

By displacing oil with cleaner burning natural gas, the project would result in the reduction of a variety of air pollutants in the region and could result in lower greenhouse gas emissions overall, since natural gas emits less carbon dioxide than oil on a volume basis when burned.

“After carefully balancing the need for the project and its environmental impacts, I find the project is in the public interest,” Cheryl LaFleur, a Democratic appointee said in her remarks while approving the project’s certificate of construction.

Source:
heartland

National Grid Halts Natural Gas Hook-Ups for NYC and Long Island

National Grid announced that it will not accept any new natural gas customers in its New York City and Long Island service areas. Last week, New York Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) denied Williams' application for water quality certification for the construction of their Northeast Supply Enhancement (NESE) pipeline.

National Grid said that until state regulators approve permits to William’s, all new natural gas hook-ups for the NYC and Long Island area will be halted. "While we continue to receive applications for new and expanded firm gas service ... none will be processed until the permits are received and (NESE) is allowed to proceed," National Grid said in a statement. 

The pipeline was approved by the FERC on May 3, but the New York DEC, in denying the permit, said the project “fails to meet New York State’s rigorous water quality standards” and “would cause impacts to habitats due to the disturbance of shellfish beds and other benthic resources.”

The NESE would be a 400,000-Mmcfd, 24-mile sub-sea pipeline costing $1 billion that will extend from the New Jersey shore across Raritan Bay and interconnecting with Williams' existing Transco pipeline into New York.

Source:
Pgjonline

Williams Partners 24-Mile Underwater Pipeline Permit Denied

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation denied a water quality permit for a 24-mile Northeast Supply Enhancement pipeline project from New Jersey to Queens. The pipeline project would expand the Transco pipeline and would allow National Grid to bring natural gas from Pennsylvania’s shale gas fields to the metropolitan region.

The pipeline was initially approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on May 3, but the environmental groups opposing the pipeline states that the pipeline will threaten marine life and extend the reliance on fossil fuels rather than renewable energy sources. Williams Partners, the pipeline developer said the project is crucial for meeting rising demand for natural gas in New York City and Long Island.

In denying the permit, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation said the project “fails to meet New York State’s rigorous water quality standards” and “would cause impacts to habitats due to the disturbance of shellfish beds and other benthic resources.”

”Our team will be evaluating the issue and resubmitting the application quickly,” said Chris Stockton, a spokesman for Williams Partners. “We are confident that we can be responsive to this technical concern, meet our customer’s in-service date and avoid a moratorium that would have a devastating impact on the regional economy and environment.”

Source:
pgjonline

FERC Authorizes William’s Transco Natural Gas Pipeline Expansion Project

Northeast Supply Enhancement project – an expansion of the existing Transco natural gas pipeline designed to serve New York markets by Williams got certificate of public convenience and necessity from FERC, the company reported.

National Grid – the largest distributor of natural gas in the northeastern United States will receive 400,000 dekatherms per day of additional natural gas supply through the Northeast Supply Enhancement project.

With the Northeast Supply Enhancement Project, National Grid’s will be able to convert about 8,000 customers per year from heating oil to natural gas in New York City and Long Island, which is critical to keep up with new development in the area.

Williams anticipates beginning construction on the Northeast Supply Enhancement project facilities in the fall of 2019, following the receipt of all necessary regulatory approvals.

“Natural gas is a critical component of the mix of energy sources necessary to meet the region’s growing energy needs and to help meet its aggressive clean air goals,” said Williams Chief Operating Officer Michael Dunn.

“NESE will provide access to critical supply to serve our customers in New York City and on Long Island, ensuring there is enough natural gas for them to heat their homes and run their businesses,” said National Grid New York President John Bruckner.

Source:
pgjonline

Williams Partners' Northeast Supply Enhancement Project to Boost Economy in Region, Study Shows

Williams Partners on Wednesday released the results of a study by researchers from Rutgers University that analyzes the economic impact of Williams' proposed $1 billion Northeast Supply Enhancement project.

The Northeast Supply Enhancement project is designed to expand from Williams' existing Transco pipeline to increase natural gas deliveries to the Northeast in time for the 2019/2020 winter heating season.

Researchers at the university concluded that the project would generate approximately $327 million in additional economic activity in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York. It would also both directly and indirectly create 3,186 jobs during the one-year construction period.

"Besides the clear environmental benefits of increased natural gas utilization, this project will offer an economic boot to the region by generating hundreds of millions of dollars in economic activity and supporting more than 3,000 good-paying jobs," said Phil Beachem, president of the NJ Alliance for Action.

The project will consist of approximately 10 miles of pipe in Pennsylvania, three miles in New Jersey, 23 miles of offshore pipe in New Jersey and New York state waters, a new compressor facility in New Jersey, and additional horsepower at an existing compressor facility in Pennsylvania.

The study was commissioned by Williams. View the complete economic impact analysis here.

Source:
PennEnergy