Enbridge Supported by Wisconsin Supreme Court in Dane County Case


A ruling from the Wisconsin Supreme Court has allowed Enbridge Energy to continue on with their pipeline project in Dane County without any additional insurance, despite the local government putting a requirement on Enbridge’s permit for a $25 million environmental liability policy.

Wisconsin lawmakers stepped in and passed a provision blocking local municipalities from putting liability requirements on an operator if they already had sufficient insurance. After a couple back and forths of courts contesting Enbridge’s quality of insurance, the high court ruled that Enbridge does have comprehensive insurance. According to Enbridge, they have $860 million worth of general liability insurance, including coverage for ’sudden and accidental’ pollution.

Despite the ruling, several people within local government have been adamant that Enbridge has yet to provide proof of adequate insurance for ’sudden and accidental’ cases. Concerned about the decision, Patricia Hammel, a landowner’s attorney, stated that it “allows Enbridge to operate the largest tar sands pipeline in the U.S. across Wisconsin without adequate insurance and exposes our people, land and water to the consequences of a catastrophic spill.”

Enbridge’s oil spill in 2010, in southwest Michigan, polluted almost 40 miles of the Kalamazoo River and cost them $1.2. billion. In addition, the United States fined them for missing deadlines on pipeline inspections prior to the spill, costing them an extra $1.8 million. The cleanup lasted until 2014.

Meanwhile, Enbridge has finished their $1.5 billion pipeline make-over and built the Waterloo pump station, which, according to a spokeswoman of Enbridge, Jennifer Smith, is necessary in order to “ensure a reliable source of energy for decades to come.”

Source:
Chron

Open Season Announced for Regional Energy Access Expansion

A binding open season for Regional Energy Access from March 8 to April 8, 2019 has been announced by Williams today. Regional Energy Access is an incremental expansion of the Transco interstate pipeline to provide firm natural gas transportation capacity to markets in the northeastern United States as early as November 2022.

Regional Energy Access is being designed to provide up to one million dekatherms per day. "Regional Energy Access is a cost-effective expansion along an existing Transco corridor that will ultimately deliver more than a billion cubic feet of new natural gas supply with minimal environmental footprint,” said Scott Hallam, senior vice president of Williams’ Atlantic-Gulf Operating Area.

This expansion minimizes environmental impacts by maximizing the use of existing Transco pipeline infrastructure and rights of way. It is anticipated that the project will include approximately 34 miles of pipeline looping and additional compression along existing Transco facilities.

The preliminary design of the project consists of additional compression and selected pipeline loop segments along the existing Transco pipeline corridor. Although the final capacity, scope and cost of the project will be determined by the results of the open season.

Source:
businesswire

Phase II Construction of Hillabee Expansion Project Kicks Off

Construction on the second phase of Williams’ Hillabee Expansion project in Chilton County, Alabama has officially started. This includes contractor mobilization, environmental training and site preparation at the location of a nearly seven-mile pipeline loop known as the Rock Springs Loop.

The second phase construction also includes horsepower modifications to two existing Transco compressor facilities. It is anticipated to be placed into service next summer and will increase the Transco pipeline’s capacity by an additional 206,000 dekatherms of natural gas per day.

Another work on nearly four-mile Verbena Loop in Choctaw County, Alabama is scheduled to begin in April.

The first phase of the Hillabee project was successfully placed into service in July 2017. This increased Transco pipeline’s capacity in Alabama by 818,410 dekatherms per day and supplied Florida power generators via the new Sabal Trail pipeline.

Source:
williams