Texas Eastern Pipeline Remains Shut after Kentucky Blast

The section of Texas Eastern pipeline that got damaged in a fatal explosion near Danville, Kentucky on last Thursday remains shut. The company is working with federal and state officials to investigate the incident. 

U.S. National Transportation Safety Board assumed control of the incident site and the company is supporting the investigation, Enbridge said. According to the Refinitiv data, about 1.7 billion cubic feet of gas was flowing through the damaged section of pipe toward the Gulf Coast at the time of the blast, from the Marcellus and Utica shale in Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia.

The company said that Texas Eastern has three lines, Line 10, 15 and 25, between its Danville and Tompkinsville compressors in Kentucky and the blast occurred on Line 15. The three lines make up its 30-inch pipeline system.

Enbridge has not estimated when the damaged section of pipe will return to service at this time and has restricted north-to-south gas flows through the Danville compressor to zero.

Source:
pgjonline

Texas Eastern Pipeline to Serve Kentucky and Tennessee After Enbridge Pipeline Explosion

The direction of natural gas flow of Enbridge’s Texas Eastern pipeline in Ohio has been reversed following the explosion of a line on Monday.

The blast injured two people and damaged three homes.

Prior to the blast, gas was flowing south through the damaged section of pipe from the Marcellus and Utica shale in Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia toward the Gulf Coast.

Now, the pipeline will serve customers in states like Tennessee and Kentucky who stopped receiving gas after the explosion.

Enbridge said it isolated two other gas pipes near the 30-inch damaged line as crews safely investigate the integrity of those lines prior to returning them to service.

An estimated return to service date has not been provided.

Source:
Reuters

Enbridge Requests Putting More of TEAL NatGas Pipe Into Service

Enbridge on Wednesday, filed with the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission seeking to put the remaining part of its Texas Eastern Appalachian Lease (TEAL) Phase 1 natural gas pipeline in Ohio into service.

Enbridge expects to have the request for the last part of the $200 million project approved by Oct. 30.

The facilities Enbridge is seeking to put into service include close to 4.4 miles of new 36-inch pipe and other equipment.

The Teal project is one of several pipelines designed to connect the Marcellus and Utica shale basins in Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Ohio with customers in other parts of the U.S. and Canada.

Enbridge put part of TEAL into service on Oct. 9.

Source:
Reuters

U.S. Approves Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline's Request to go in Service

A request by Williams Cos Inc’s Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Co (Transco) unit to put the Atlantic Sunrise natural gas pipeline from Pennsylvania to South Carolina into service, has been approved by U.S. federal energy regulators on Thursday.

The Atlantic Sunrise is designed to connect the Marcellus and Utica shale basins in Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Ohio with customers in other parts of the U.S. and Canada.

In a filing that approved the nearly $3 billion project’s start up, FERC said that Transco has “adequately stabilized the areas disturbed by construction and that restoration is proceeding satisfactorily.”

198 miles of new pipe, located mostly in Pennsylvania, will carry around 1.7 bcfd. Two new compressor stations and compressor station modification in five states will also be included in the project.

Cabot Oil & Gas Corp has secured about 1 bcfd of transport capacity on Atlantic Sunrise.

Williams said it started laying new pipe in Pennsylvania in September 2017. FERC authorized construction of the project in February 2017.

Source:
Reuters

Appeals Court Comes to Unanimous Decision to Cancel MVP Permit

An appeals court sided with environmental groups on Friday, canceling permits issued by the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service allowing the Mountain Valley Pipeline to cut through federal land.

The three-judge panel came to a unanimous decision and accused the agencies of ignoring environmental regulations and acquiescing to justifications offered by the pipeline company on the project’s environmental impact.

Construction of the pipeline prompted protests earlier this year, including people climbing into trees in the pipeline's path as well as chaining themselves to construction equipment.

The appeals court decision comes after EQT decided to delay the Mountain Valley pipeline completion target to next year.

The estimated costs for the project also changed, increasing from $3.5 billion to $3.7 billion.

Source:
Seeking Alpha
Star Tribute

Mountain Valley Pipeline Receives Sixth Citing for Failing to Contain Muddy Water Flow

For the sixth time, environmental regulators have cited Mountain Valley Pipeline for failing to contain muddy water flowing from construction sites.

A notice of violation was recently issued against Mountain Valley Pipeline by the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection, according to a filing Thursday with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. It marks the sixth time environmental regulators have cited the Pittsburgh company for failing to contain muddy water flow from construction sites.

A former senior environmental engineer for DEQ said that it’s “pretty extraordinary” for so many flaws to with erosion and sediment control devices to be present, especially with their purpose of preventing runoff from reaching streams and other sensitive natural resources along construction zone.

He added that “if it’s one and it’s an accident or an oversight, then yeah, you give them some slack…But if it continues to happen — two, three, five or eight times — that’s too many.”

Mountain Valley officials said they took corrective actions with most of the reported violations, however if problems persist, more serious enforcement actions could occur. Regulators have not taken those steps yet, but fines and stop-work orders have already been requested from one Virginia senator.

 “It is not an overstatement to say that science dictates that this pipeline cannot be safely built in this area,” the senator wrote in a letter to the governor dated Friday.

 “With or without controls, slopes at these grades are too steep and doomed to have mudslides and sediment erosion,” the letter stated. “In fact, MVP crosses some of the steepest terrain in the eastern United States with unstable, porous limestone ‘karst’ land filled with caves, sinkholes and landslides.”

Spokeswoman Natalie Cox could not be reached Monday for comments on the most recent reported notice of violation in West Virginia, but a letter from company attorneys sent to FERC said that the Mountain Valley has already addressed the issues raised in the notice.

Source:
The Roanoke Times

ETP's Rover NatGas Pipeline Construction Delayed by Ohio's EPA

Energy Transfer Partners LP said on Monday that the completion of their Rover natural gas pipeline was being delayed due to state environmental regulators in Ohio using a notice of violation related to the unapproved disposal of industrial waste.

According to the EPA’s July 11 filing with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency issued the violation after the ETP deposited “spent drilling mud” containing low levels of a chemical solvent called tetrachlorethene, or PCE, without approval.

PCE is used in dry cleaning of fabrics and is used in the manufacture of other chemicals.

“Ohio EPA’s filing of the (notice of violations) with FERC was not for any legitimate purpose, but rather was an attempt to cynically use the commission to once again delay the completion of this necessary project,” ETP said in its filing with the federal regulator on Monday.

The $4.2 billion Rover project was planned to be completed in November 2017, but numerous notices of violations led to delays and temporary stop-work orders. The project would carry up to 3.25 billion cubic feet per day of gas from the Marcellus and Utica shale region fields in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia to U.S. Midwest and Gulf Coast as well as Ontario, Canada.

Source:
Reuters 

Federal Regulators Approve NatGas Pipeline in Maryland

Federal regulators on Thursday approved plans for the Columbia Gas natural gas pipeline that would cross parts of western Maryland near Hancock.

The pipeline is designed to extend 3.37 miles from Columbia’s network in Pennsylvania, crossing Washington Country and going under the Potomac River to reach Mountaineer Gas distribution systems located in West Virginia.

Maryland regulators first approved the plan in March, despite opposition from environmentalists who have voiced their opinions on how the state should have more thorough vetting processes in place for all pipelines' potential environmental impacts.

Maryland’s Environment Secretary Ben Grumbles says that the project will need to meet strong environmental conditions beyond the requirements made by the Army Corps of Engineers and FERC.

Source:
Charlotte Observer

ETP Receives 65th Notice of Violation for Fluid Leak

Energy Transfer Partner LP’s Sunoco Mariner East 2 natural gas liquids pipeline was given another notice of violation from Pennsylvania environmental regulators this week because of the pipeline spilling drilling fluid in a wetland.

The project has now received 65 notice of violations from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) since the construction began in February 2017. The DEP said that ETP must report how it will clean the spill, among addressing other issues, prior to the company restarting drilling at the site.

Liquids from the Marcellus and Utica shale fields in western Pennsylvania are transported through the Mariner East project to customers in the state as well as international exports from ETP’s Marcus Hook complex near Philadelphia.

The latest spill was 3,500 gallons of drilling fluid that spilled into wetland associated with horizontal drilling on July 11 in an area 70 miles east of Pittsburgh.

The project will boost capacity of the Mariner East project from 70,000 barrels per day to 345,000 barrels per day, opening the pipeline suppliers in Ohio and West Virginia.

Source:
Reuters

Leach Xpress Natural Gas Pipeline Receives Approval, Returns to Service

TransCanada Corp’s Columbia Gas Transmission said that the section of its Leach Xpress natural gas pipeline that was damaged in June’s West Virginia blast returned to service July 15th after permission given by PHMSA. 

The return means that gas output in the Appalachian region will be boosted with the expected production rising to 28.7 billion cubic feet per day on Monday from 28.1 bcfd on Friday.

Prior to the June 7th blast, output was about 27.5 bcfd.

PHMSA gave Columbia 30 days to respond to a list of concerns that would improve the safety of the Leach Xpress including mechanical and metallurgical testing as well as enhanced surveillance and monitoring, among other actions required.

Since the blast, Columbia identified six other areas that PHMSA said were concerning based on soil conditions and steep slopes. The soil condition was the cause of a landslide that put stress on the pipelines resulting in a blast, according to preliminary investigations.

Shutting down the Leach Xpress forced producers to find other pipes to ship gas out of Marcellus and Utica shale regions of Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Ohio.

The blast damaged sections of the pipe that could affect 1.3 billion cubic feet per day, which is enough energy to fuel more than 5 million U.S. homes a day.

Energy analysts said that the blast hardly affected Appalachian region’s overall output because of other pipes being found by different producers.

Source: 
Reuters

Leach Xpress NatGas Pipeline to Return to Service July 15

TransCanada Corp’s Columbia Gas Transmission has announced July 15 as the date it expects its Leach Xpress natural gas pipeline to resume service after it was damaged in a blast in West Virginia on June 7.

Federal pipeline safety regulators will first need to approve the returning service, Columbia Gas Transmission said in a Thursday notice given out to customers using the pipeline.

PHMSA gave Columbia 30 days to respond to a list of concerns that would improve the safety of the Leach Xpress. Those actions included mechanical and metallurgical testing as well as enhanced surveillance and monitoring, among other actions required.

Since the blast, Columbia identified six other areas that PHMSA said were concerning based on soil conditions and steep slopes. The soil condition was the cause of a landslide that put stress on the pipelines resulting in a blast, according to preliminary investigations.

Shutting down the Leach Xpress forced producers to find other pipes to ship gas out of Marcellus and Utica shale regions of Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Ohio.

The blast damaged sections of the pipe that could affect 1.3 billion cubic feet per day, which is enough energy to fuel more than 5 million U.S. homes a day.

Energy analysts said that the blast hardly affected Appalachian region’s overall output because of other pipes being found by different producers.

Source: 
Reuters

 

Landslide Apparent Cause of Rupture and Explosion of West Virginia Pipeline

Columbia Gas Transmission told federal pipeline regulators that the cause of last month’s pipeline explosion in West Virginia was apparently due to a landslide.

The site of the break was at the bottom of a steep hill on Nixon Ridge, south of Moundsville, and exploded after the landslide caused a rupture in the new natural gas pipeline.

No one was injured, and no homes were in danger at the time of the incident that occurred Thursday morning around 4:15 AM, authorities told local news media.

The expected in-service date has been pushed back from early July to the middle of the month as TransCanada, the owner of the Columbia Gas Transmission system, works on repairing the pipeline.

A TransCanada spokesperson said that it could take months or years for federal regulators to complete their investigation of the incident, although “internal findings point to land subsidence as the cause of the rupture.”

The company added on their website that “the weather in the region has continued to create challenging conditions during the remediation process.”

A Reuters analysts said West Virginia was producing about 4.8 billion cubic feet per day of gas near the time of the explosion, which was the same amount as earlier in the week.

The pipeline was not operating above its maximum pressure at the time of the incident.

Source:
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette