FERC Pipeline Decision Will Be Challenged by New York Agency

Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's recent decision to allow construction of a 125-mile-long natural gas pipeline that would stretch from northern Pennsylvania to Schoharie County, west of Albany, will be challenged by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

According to the Department of Environmental Conservation, the FERC decision sides with the fossil fuel industry over protecting the environment. But the Tulsa, Oklahoma-based pipeline firm says that the 30-inch-wide pipeline would have the capacity to serve 3 million homes and can help stabilize New York energy prices.

Environmentalists claim these lines will only serve to further the dependence on fossil fuels. The Army Corp of Engineers must approve plans before construction begins.

Source:
chron

Williams Partners NG Pipeline to Move Forward Despite New York’s Objections

New York’s denial of a water quality permit that had blocked Williams Partners natural gas pipeline project was cleared by Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The regulators ruled last Wednesday that the state Department of Environmental Conservation missed a one-year deadline when it rejected the permit in 2016.

After New York rejected a water quality permit over concerns for 250 streams, Williams appealed to federal courts. But after losing court challenges, Williams appealed to FERC. The 124-mile, 30-inch-wide pipeline would run from Pennsylvania’s shale gas fields to eastern New York.

The project still needs a permit from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Williams spokesman Christopher Stockton said. He added that the project sponsors are evaluating their next steps.

Source:
pgjonline

National Grid Halts Natural Gas Hook-Ups for NYC and Long Island

National Grid announced that it will not accept any new natural gas customers in its New York City and Long Island service areas. Last week, New York Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) denied Williams' application for water quality certification for the construction of their Northeast Supply Enhancement (NESE) pipeline.

National Grid said that until state regulators approve permits to William’s, all new natural gas hook-ups for the NYC and Long Island area will be halted. "While we continue to receive applications for new and expanded firm gas service ... none will be processed until the permits are received and (NESE) is allowed to proceed," National Grid said in a statement. 

The pipeline was approved by the FERC on May 3, but the New York DEC, in denying the permit, said the project “fails to meet New York State’s rigorous water quality standards” and “would cause impacts to habitats due to the disturbance of shellfish beds and other benthic resources.”

The NESE would be a 400,000-Mmcfd, 24-mile sub-sea pipeline costing $1 billion that will extend from the New Jersey shore across Raritan Bay and interconnecting with Williams' existing Transco pipeline into New York.

Source:
Pgjonline

Williams Partners 24-Mile Underwater Pipeline Permit Denied

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation denied a water quality permit for a 24-mile Northeast Supply Enhancement pipeline project from New Jersey to Queens. The pipeline project would expand the Transco pipeline and would allow National Grid to bring natural gas from Pennsylvania’s shale gas fields to the metropolitan region.

The pipeline was initially approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on May 3, but the environmental groups opposing the pipeline states that the pipeline will threaten marine life and extend the reliance on fossil fuels rather than renewable energy sources. Williams Partners, the pipeline developer said the project is crucial for meeting rising demand for natural gas in New York City and Long Island.

In denying the permit, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation said the project “fails to meet New York State’s rigorous water quality standards” and “would cause impacts to habitats due to the disturbance of shellfish beds and other benthic resources.”

”Our team will be evaluating the issue and resubmitting the application quickly,” said Chris Stockton, a spokesman for Williams Partners. “We are confident that we can be responsive to this technical concern, meet our customer’s in-service date and avoid a moratorium that would have a devastating impact on the regional economy and environment.”

Source:
pgjonline

FERC Allows National Fuel Pipeline Project to Cross Stream

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has overruled the New York State Department of Environment Conservation’s (DEC) decision to deny National Fuel’s $455 million Northern Access Pipeline project from stream-crossing.

The FERC said in a Tuesday statement that it was pleased with the ruling and will start to develop a revised timeline for the project as well as a review of other relevant permits.

Opponents of the pipeline have been against the project since the beginning stages, and expected a different outcome based on previous FERC rulings of similar state-level decisions on waterways.

National Impact has hailed the project’s economic impact and its role in creating jobs as well as raising property tax assessments. The company also said that the project would open up critical new capacity to the northeastern United States.

Other lawsuits remain, and observers of the project believe that there are still a few hurdles that need to be addressed prior to continuing construction.

Source:
The Business Journals