Sioux Tribe Leader Asks White House to Help Stop Pipeline

Front Lawn of White House in Washington, D.C. by Daniel Schwen, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4156824

Front Lawn of White House in Washington, D.C. by Daniel Schwen, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4156824

Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Chairman David Archambault II has advanced for help from the White House to stop the Dakota Access pipeline from being constructed on the Tribe’s sacred lands.

Continuing their effort to halt the $3.8 billion crude oil interstate pipeline, the Tribe has been working to ensure their protests remain peaceful.

“There is no place for threats, violence, or criminal activity,” Archambault said in a teleconference with reporters.

Even so, Archambault and other members of the Tribe were arrested this past week for interfering with the project. They were also sued by the developers of the pipeline for their interference as the developers alleged the protestors were risking the safety of workers and law enforcement.

Archambault told reporters that he has asked President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama to help with the initiative.

“If there’s any way [President Obama] can intervene and move this pipeline off our treaty lands, I’m asking him,” said Archambault.

The Dakota Access pipeline, headed by Energy Transfer Partners, is a 1,172-mile crude oil pipeline that will run through North and South Dakota, Iowa, and Illinois.

Source:
Houston Chronicle