Princeton Researchers Receive Grant for Methane Detection Technology

Infrared imagery of the 2015 Aliso Canyon methane leak shows a black cloud coming from the ground. (  EPA  /  BBC  )

Infrared imagery of the 2015 Aliso Canyon methane leak shows a black cloud coming from the ground. (EPA/BBC)

The Department of Energy earlier last month awarded a grant valued at $1,188,735 to researchers at Princeton University to help them develop a sensor that would detect methane leaks from pipelines, compressor stations, and other midstream infrastructure, according to The Daily Princetonian.

The money will be awarded to the university over a course of three years as researchers work toward goals laid out in the President’s Climate Action Plan Strategy to Reduce Methane Emissions that focuses on methane mitigation and methane quantification.

The grant falls under the category of methane mitigation, according to Christopher Freitas, the senior program manager for the Department of Energy’s Fossil Energy Midstream Natural Gas Infrastructure Program. Researchers will work to use a chirped laser dispersion spectroscopy system to detect atmospheric methane, which will allow for the use of optical dispersion rather than optical absorption, allowing for advantages when used in remote sensing.

Those involved in the project hope the new technology will be used to detect leaks at midstream facilities by mounting the technology to cars or aircraft that can move along the pipelines or compressor stations to detect methane leaks.

“We look forward to working with Princeton on this critical research,” Freitas told The Daily Princetonian.

Source:
The Daily Princetonian