President Obama Says Alternate Routes Are in Discussion for Dakota Access Pipeline

The controversial DAPL progressing across Southern Story and Northern Polk Counties in Central Iowa. Photo by Carl Wycoff from Nevada, USA (Dakota Access Pipe Line) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

The controversial DAPL progressing across Southern Story and Northern Polk Counties in Central Iowa. Photo by Carl Wycoff from Nevada, USA (Dakota Access Pipe Line) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

In an interview with NowThis news, President Obama stated his first remarks about the Dakota Access pipeline controversy, saying both sides of the protest should show restraint and that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is considering an alternative route for the pipeline.

In the interview published Tuesday, Obama said the government is monitoring the situation closely and that he believes there is a way to accommodate the Native Americans’ lands without compromising the pipeline.

For months, protests have occurred against Energy Transfer’s 1,170-mile, $3.7 billion crude oil pipeline, mainly near Cannon Ball, North Dakota where Native American tribes believe the pipeline would contaminate water supply and destroy sacred lands.

The last hurdle for pipeline construction is a 20-mile stretch near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, through Federal lands and underneath the Missouri River. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is currently reviewing permits for the land.

“We are going to let it play out for several more weeks and determine whether or not this can be resolved in a way that I think is properly attentive to the traditions of the first Americans,” Obama said in the interview.

Source:
The New York Times