Dominion Energy Simulates Visual Impacts of Proposed Pipeline

View down a ski slope in Wintergreen, Nelson County, Virginia by Mojo Hand (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

View down a ski slope in Wintergreen, Nelson County, Virginia by Mojo Hand (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Dominion Energy on Tuesday released detailed simulations of its proposed pipeline’s visual impacts on the Wintergreen area in Virginia as part of an effort to gain community support of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline.

Partnering with Truescape, a firm that helps companies put together and communicate complex concepts through visuals, Dominion Energy hopes the simulations will help communities better get an understanding of the effects the pipeline infrastructure would have on its surrounding environment if it is approved for construction.

Using the simulations, Dominion wants to show communities that the pipeline could go “virtually unnoticed,” and prove wrong the misconception that the visual impacts of the pipeline are going to pose risk to tourism and take away from the scenic views of the area.

Ernie Reed, member of the anti-pipeline group Friends of Nelson, told News Advance that Dominion is trying to dilute a serious issue with the simulations. He does not believe the simulations will provide a realistic picture of the pipeline’s actual impact on the lands.

“There’s nothing real about a simulation. If you want to see the impact, go find yourself a 42-inch pipeline,” he told News Advance by phone.

The Atlantic Coastline is a proposed natural gas pipeline project that would run 550 miles through Virginia, West Virginia, and North Carolina. It is still under regulatory review and is scheduled to potentially gain approval from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission by late summer of next year.

Source:
News Advance
Dominion Energy